Barriers and Facilitators to deprescribing in care homes

Background

An investigation into the barriers and facilitators to stopping inappropriate medicines (“deprescribing”) for older people living in care homes to inform the development of a novel intervention.

Sponsor: 

University of Leeds

Chief Investigator:

Emma Bolton

Contact details:

hcevb@leeds.ac.uk

ETNA-AF-Europe

Background

Allopurinol is a medication usually used to prevent gout. Allopurinol has several positive effects on the heart and blood vessels, is inexpensive and is already widely used in patients. Ischaemic heart disease is common in people in the UK. In this study, the researchers want to improve the treatment of patients with ischaemic heart disease. The study team will investigate whether adding allopurinol to these patients’ usual medications will reduce their risk of having a stroke, heart attack or of dying due to cardiovascular disease.

Sponsor: 

Quintiles

Chief Investigator:

Dr Ameet Bakhai 

Contact details:

 

How do GPs explain their information sharing behaviours

Background

There are several circumstances in which GPs are asked or expected to share information about their patients, for example with clinical colleagues, with other services, with health managers and with researchers. This work aims to describe how GPs share information with others and the explanations they give for that data sharing. Study involvement for the GPs (IG Lead) who participate will involve a short interview with the researcher (either by telephone or face-to-face).

Sponsor: 

University of Leeds

Chief Investigator:

Dr Jon Fistein

Contact details:

J.L.Fistein@leeds.ac.uk

Meeting the physical healthcare needs of people with serious mental illness in primary care

Background

The purpose of the study is to better understand the healthcare needs of people with serious mental illness. It aims not just to explore the challenges associated with providing care to this patient group, but also to find examples of good practice – to learn what enables the physical health needs of this group to be managed more effectively.

Sponsor: 

University of York

Chief Investigator:

Dr Kate Bosanquet

Contact details:

kate.bosanquet@york.ac.uk

Understanding variation in referral decisions in primary care

Background

GPs’ suspicion of serious disease, such as cancer, and patient referral to secondary care can be thought of as a classic Signal Detection problem. Signal Detection Theory (SDT) can be applied when a stimulus (‘signal’) must be detected during a succession of trials, some of which contain the stimulus (‘signal’ trials) and some of which do not (‘noise’ trials). GPs seek to detect a possible cancer (‘signal’) out of a population of patients without cancer (‘noise’). The reason cancers are missed or patients without cancer get referred is that the evidence available for referral decisions is weak or ambiguous. In primary care, where cancers can present early and with non specific symptoms, there is an inherent difficulty in cancer detection and referral. SDT allows us to calculate measures such as referral threshold (i.e., the propensity to refer) and discrimination ability (i.e., ability to discriminate between ‘signal’ and ‘noise’) for individual decision makers casting their decisions on a large number of simulated patient cases (vignettes). GPs may differ in either their threshold (liberal vs. conservative) or their discrimination ability or both. The study team aim to calculate these indices for a sizeable group of GPs and then look for correlates, such as GP experience and practice demographics.

Sponsor: 

Imperial College London

Chief Investigator:

Dr Olga Kostopoulou

Contact details:

o.kostopoulou@imperial.ac.uk

 

VACCept Survey

To explore the acceptability of vaccination and knowledge of HPV in women aged 30 to 45 years attending for cervical screening

Background

The aim of the VACCept survey is ascertain what women aged 30 to 45 and attending for cervical screening know and think of screening and the acceptability of HPV vaccination. We also aim to collect information about them to see if there are factors influencing their views on the acceptability of HPV vaccines. 

Sponsor: 

Queen Mary University of London

Chief Investigator:

Dr Tony Hollingworth

Contact details:

t.hollingworth@qmul.ac.uk

Views and experiences of penicillin allergy testing

Background

Approximately 10% of the UK population are allergic to penicillin according to their medical records, but fewer than 10% of these people are likely to be truly allergic. This study aims to interview GPs and patients in England to understand how patients with a record of penicillin allergy are managed in primary care when they have infections.

Sponsor: 

University of Leeds

Chief Investigator:

Dr Sarah Tonkin-Crine

Contact details:

Sarah.tonkin-crine@phc.ox.ac.uk